10th Jun2013

Review :: The Silent Comedy: Friends Divide EP

by Ryan

friendsdivide

Release Date: June 10, 2013

I met the guys of The Silent Comedy last summer somewhat by chance. I was trying to get a band to come out to play an event for my company. The guy I wanted wasn’t available, but I got connected to The Silent Comedy instead. I was immediately blown away. They’ve got an amazing aesthetic, but that pales in comparison to their genre-bending music – at times full on rock n roll, at other times fit for a saloon. Fittingly, they’ve had songs featured on both History Channel series and video game trailers.

This EP comes amidst two years of heavy touring across the U.S. and U.K along with the (not quite) equally impressive The Heavy. (At some point when time allows I’ll revisit my story of attempting to catch their show at the El Rey Theater in L.A.) The band continues to tour this summer again with The Heavy, as well as a stint with the amazing Z.Z. Ward.

God Neon: A raucous, barn-burner. The whole album plays out like a night at the bar and this track is your first shot of whiskey. As someone on twitter commented, this is surely a “chair thrower” live. With a driving rhythm and trademark jangly banjo taking the lead, Josh’s aggressive vocals provide a welcomed wake-up call.

Always Two: For some reason, this track reminds me a lot of Pete Yorn‘s Day I Forgot (2008) album. There’s also a hint of Ryan Adams in there. Heartbreaking and relatable, “Oh darlin’ don’t be sad / some dreams they never come true. Remember what your mother said / baby there are always two: / the one you love and the one who loves you.” I would have loved to hear a high harmony on “the one you love.”

Light of Day: Easily my favorite track on the record, this track has a spiritual kinship to their “Bartholomew.” You can almost see a ghost pirate ship sailing through the midnight fog as the eerie intro hits. The full group vocals on the chorus add a fullness and power while extending the creepiness a step further. The song is featured below in a tour promo video.

Simple Thing: This one strikes me as a late night tavern toe-tapper. It’s got a playful, jaunty style about it.

You Don’t Know Me: This is not the classic Cindy Walker ballad made famous by Ray Charles. As I mentioned the album feeling like a night at the bar, this is the “maybe we should call it a night” track. If “Light of Day” is reminiscent of “Bartholomew”, this track brings to mind the band’s “Gasoline“, though it never really lights up the way the latter does.

Ghosts: The doubled vocals by Jeremiah and Josh showcases their familial similarities, while highlighting each one’s uniqueness. It may be the lyrical content, but this track (again) brings to mind the great Ryan Adams. Closing down our night at the bar, this track calls for one more round for everyone with pints held high, arms wrapped around one another as we all shout to the rafters.

There are a ton of artists out there who are right on the verge of greatness. These guys are definitely putting in the 10,000 hours necessary. They’ve got the skill and they’ve made the connections. While they are a bit niche, their undefinable genre has been growing. I’m hoping for the best for them and the next time they make it to Dallas and I’m going to yell at everyone around me to go see them.

Go buy this and everything else they’ve put out. Now.

 

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